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Salvator Mundi is a painting of Christ as Salvator Mundi (Savior of the World)

The painting shows Christ, in Renaissance garb, giving a benediction with his raised right hand and crossed fingers while holding a crystal sphere in his left hand.

The image is at once perfect and effortless: its symbolism is compelling and its technique is masterful. Here, Christ doesn’t just look out at us from a boring blackish-brown interior: He subtly gazes at us through layers of sufamato that belie eternity. 

Painted on walnut, recently attributed to Leonardo da Vinci, the subject, Jesus Christ, was commissioned for Louis XII of France between 1506 and 1513. The recently authenticated work was once owned by Charles I of England and recorded in his art collection in 1649  After he was executed, it went to Charles II, later it was auctioned by the son of the Duke of Buckingham and Normanby in 1763.

The trinitarian hand gesture symbolises that the male and female part of the spirit (the two fingers) is united together under a covenant made with the divine (pointing upwards). 

In da Vincis painting Jesus is wearing the Virgins blue color and not his usual red color; this symbolises the union of the male and female spirit.  However, Jesus is painted very androgynous in da Vincis painting, this again signifies the union of the male and female spirit 

Notice that the leather pattern matches the Kabbalah Tree of life where the heart gem is the Da’at sephiroth and symbolizes the unification between the male and the female (se picture below). 

There are three lights reflecting in the glass Globus Crusiger, this again points to the trinity of the male, female, and divine.  He is holding the mundus, the world which he’s saving.   Orbs in other Salvator Mundis, often they’re of a kind of brass or solid. Sometimes they’re terrestrial globes, sometimes they’re translucent glass, and one or two even have little landscapes in them. What is amazing about this one is that it is a crystal ball.  

Golden ratio proportions in composition of Salvator Mundi starting with golden rectangle for the head.

The golden ratios presented in the illustrations in this article and the related video were created with PhiMatrix. As its grid is resized and lines are added, every line it creates is in a golden ratio proportion to the ones on either side it, accurate to the pixel.

A more complete look at golden ratios in Salvator Mundi is presented in this YouTube video. As you watch the video, consider the detailed anatomical studies da Vinci did and imagine him planning and measuring every aspect of each element of this painting. Imagine him striving to capture an essence of the Divine on a two-dimensional, 26” x 18” board.

Twiggie 

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